The GemHunter

Professor Hausel's Guide to Finding Gemstones, Diamonds, Gold, Rocks & Minerals 

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MONSTER GOLD DEPOSIT FOUND IN ALASKA - One of the 10 Largest Gold Deposits Found in History

Posted by gemhunter on February 4, 2016 at 12:15 AM

The Northern Miner (Feb. 11-17, 2013) described Donlin Creek as a MONSTER GOLD DEPOSIT with more than 43 million ounces of gold reserves! In addition, gold resources are suggested to include another 140 million inferred ounces and only about 40% of the gold-bearing intrusive has been drilled to date, making this already one of the 10 largest gold deposits ever found - by time the entire deposit is drilled and mined, it could easily end up being one of the largest gold deposits every to be found in all of human history!

To understand how big this gold deposit is, try comparing it to one of the more extraordinary world-class gold deposits in history: the Homestake mine in South Dakota. The Homestake operated for 123 years making it one of the longest lived gold mines in history. Production at the Homestake began in 1878 and ceased in 2001 after the mine produced 39.8 million ounces of gold. The Homestake was also one of the longest listed stocks on the NYSE! But, this one gold deposit in Alaska, dwarfs the Homestake, and has more than 4.5 times the amount of gold!


The Northern Miner reported the Donlin Creek to be the largest undeveloped gold deposit in the world! Imagine finding such a giant gold deposit.


For seven geologists, this was a discovery of a lifetime - how many people in history can claim discovery of such a monster gold deposit? Those seven geologists were honored at the 2009 PDAC Convention in Toronto Canada.


Just how big is this monster gold deposit? Here are some statistics to think about. To help put this gold deposit in the proper perspective, compare the 43.5 million ounce gold resource at Donlin Creek to various gold states. Then compare the resource and inferred gold deposit to all of these. 


The Donlin Creek Gold discovery...

 

  • Contains 10 times more gold than was mined during the entire mining history of Arizona from 1774 to the present!
  • Has 4.5 times more gold than has been mined in Alaska from 1848 to the present!
  • Contains 1.5 times more gold than mined in California during its entire mining history!
  • Has 3.6 times more gold than was mined in Colorado during its entire mining history!
  • Contains 206 times more gold than was mined in https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georgia_Gold_Rush" target="_blank">Georgia from 1839 to the present (870,000 ounces)!
  • Contains 18 times more gold than was mined in Montana from 1852 to present!
  • Has 150 times more gold than was mined in North Carolina from 1799 to the present (1.2 million ounces)!
  • Has more gold than has been mined in Nevada from 1852 to the present (152 million ounces)!
  • Contains 19 times more gold than mined in during the entire history of Oregon (9.3 million ounces of historical production)!
  • Has ten times more gold mined in the entire history of Utah (more than 17.7 million ounces)!
  • Contains 467 times more gold than was mined during the entire history of Wyoming (385,000 ounces)!

 

Even the Klondike can't compare. All of the gold mined in the Klondike (18.3 million ounces) is only 1/10th of the amount of gold drilled at Donlin Creek! 


It was discovered by seven geologists working for WestGold (Anglo American and DeBeers subsidary) and included three from Wyoming: Mark Bronston, Dr. Paul Graff, and W. Dan Hausel. The other geologists who contributed to the discovery included Richard Garnett, Bruce Hickok (RIP), Tony Hinderman and Robert Retherford. Some of these geologists went on to make other discoveries, W. Dan Hausel in particular, made many other gold and gemstone discoveries following the Alaskan discovery and has become one of the greatest mineral discoveries in history. None of the geologists monetarily benefited from the gold discovery and only recovered wages, but had a wonderful time.




Categories: Gold Prospecting, Gold Discoveries, Arizona Geologist

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